Testing to remove asbestos hazards from the home

| Jan 5, 2021 | Asbestos Exposure, Mesothelioma |

Residents of Tennessee may know that asbestos is a problematic mineral. It has properties that, for a long time, made it a very desirable material; for example, asbestos is flame-resistant and durable. For a time, it seemed like a great idea to use it as insulation, siding for homes and even in covers for books. However, asbestos is now a recognized carcinogen, and it’s been outlawed in many industries, but it’s still present in at least one common household product.

The problem of talcum powder

In recent years, talcum powder has been implicated in the development of many cancers. Over 10,000 personal injury lawsuits are presently winding their way through the courts. Some of the most common cancers linked to talcum powder usage include female reproductive cancers, such as ovarian, uterine and other cancers. Particles bury themselves in the sensitive reproductive tissue and never leave. However, the powder has also been linked to the development of malignant mesothelioma.

It can take just one inhaled asbestos fiber to start to cause trouble in the lungs. Regrettably, there are minerals like asbestos mixed in with talc much of the time. Currently, there’s no testing process to establish the purity of talcum powder products. It’s unclear if other dangerous minerals are present in these powders, too. The FDA is considering implementing a testing program. In the meantime, consumers who still want to use powder might consider switching to cornstarch-based powders.

Getting compensation due to asbestos-related illness

If you or someone you love has been impacted by the asbestos fibers hidden in talcum powder, it’s a good idea to contact a lawyer. An experienced attorney may help you pursue a claim against the manufacturer for damages. Your attorney may be able to determine if you have an actionable case and how to proceed.